The Gospel Truth

Back to Bataan

May 3, 2010
15 Comments

One of the most horrific events of the early war was the Bataan Death March in 1942.

After the American defeat on the Bataan Peninsula in the Philipines, the Japanese forced a 60-mile march of 75,000 American and Filipino prisoners that killed several thousand prisoners.

Those who were unable to keep up with the pace were summarily executed on the spot where they fell.

The Japanese attitude was comparable to that of the Nazis who eliminated all its useless eaters,who were a drain on the country’s limited physical and medical resources.

This pragmatic attitude of eliminating all those who waste government resources bodes poorly for America.

I believe that just as slavery was our most compelling social and moral issue of the 19th century and similarly with abortion in the 20th century, this country will see euthanasia as the most controversial issue in the 21st century.

The recent passage of ObamaCare with its provisions about end-of-life counseling all Americans, especially senior citizens, should give pause for real concern.

This is not to suggest that America has become a den of Nazis or Japanese fascists but only to point out that some of the seeds have been sown for what might arguably lead to an embedded system of passive euthanasia for the elderly and the infirmed.

Once that starts it will be only a matter of time when active euthanasia rules the medical profession.

This will be true because since the 2nd half of the previous century the U. S. has undergone a subtle transformation from being one nation under God to that of a polygotinous collection of rival special interests that relied more on secular principles than any religious guidance.

While religion had always supported traditional virtues, such as patriotism, fidelity, loyalty and honesty, our cultural leaders have relied on the secular virtues of tolerance, expediency, practical reasoning and compassion.

On a related note, since the 1930s the federal government has gradually increased its control over and responsibility for many of the quotidian functions that previously had been handled by state governments or individual self-reliance.

These new “rights” or entitlements have come with a sticker-shock price tag.   Profligate government spending has been more the rule than the exception.

But even that has its limitations. With the advent of a federal assumption of health care for over 300 million Americans, predicted expenditures are off the charts.

Add to this a startling doctor shortage.  The US has not kept pace with its expanding populations with incentivizing young people to become doctors.

If anything the legal profession has especially chased thousands upon thousands of qualified men and women from even considering medicine as a career choice.

When the ill effects of ObamaCare become apparent, it will chase thousands more from the roles, reducing our medicine to the level of the VA hospital system.

Government medicine will then be the only game in town and we will be …at last at their mercy.   Have you ever received compassion from the IRS?

It is at this stage that a reasoned pragmatism has to kick in so that government can fulfill its promises and avoid insolvency.

Since the elderly now account for 80% of our medical expenditures, logic dictates that their health care be restricted.

While there may not be any visible death panels, or any overt duty to die programs, there is a systemic incentive there for cutting costs by limiting treatment to those who need the most treatment.

To make matters worse, the environmental movement has employed its apocalyptic ruminations in order to condition Americans to accept a lifeboat mentality that sees mankind as the enemy of humanity.

Thanks to the bogus science of Rachel Carson’s A Silent Spring, they have effectively reduced the population of Africa with their outlawing of DDT, an innocuous pesticide that had virtually eliminated malaria and other insect-born diseases from the earth.

Now it’s back with a vengeance, killing millions each year.

They believe that a reduction in population will reduce man’s carbon footprint and thus avert the alleged disasters of  climate change.

This is at variance from the teachings of the Church that says all men are created in God’s image and likeness.  Government has borrowed more from George Orwell’s Animal Farm idea that held …but some were more equal.

This is not a conspiracy but a natural result, emanating from ideas that have replaced God with a religion of humanity.

It flows more from a morally indifferent expediency that reasons that American youth is the future and the elderly are part of the disposable past.

If we are not more vigilant the United States may experience something akin to Back to Bataan.

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About author

After graduating from Holy Cross, Bill Borst earned an MA in Asian History from St. John's University and a Ph.D in American History from St. Louis University. (1972) A former New Yorker, he taught for many years in the St. Louis area, while also hosting a weekly radio show on WGNU from 1984-2006. He currently is a regular substitute for conservative Phyllis Schlafly on KSIV radio. (1320) He is the author of two books on social history, "Liberalism: Fatal Consequences," and "The Scorpion and the Frog: A Natural Conspiracy." He just retired as the Features editor of the Mindszenty Foundation Monthly Report. In his 11 years from 2003-2013 he wrote nearly 130 essays on Catholic culture and world affairs. Many in St. Louis also know him as the "Baseball Professor," because of a course that he offered at Maryville College from 1973-74. It was arguably the first fully-accredited baseball history course in the Midwest.The author of several short books on the old St. Louis Browns, he started the St. Louis Browns Historical Society in 1984. In 2009 his first two plays were produced on the local stage. "The Last Memory of an Ol' Brownie Fan," ran six performances at the Sound Stage in Crestwood and "A Perfect Choice" ran for two performances at the Rigali Center Theater in Shrewsberry. His third play, "A Moment of Grace," ran six performances at DeSmet High School in January of 2011with First Run Theater in January of 2011. He is currently working on a 4th play, "A Family Way," which is a comedy about a happy dysfunctional family. He can reached at bbprof@sbcglobal.net

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